Streetbeat Eyes and Ears 29 May 2020

This week on Eyes and Ears we have an indigenous focus due to National Reconciliation Week.

Neil:

Sydney Film Festival Film Series from 10 June. Inparticular Neil suggests Our Law a story about the first WA Indigenous run Police Station and Skin of Others, about the complete portrait off the WWI indigenous soldier Douglas Grant.

Mariko:

Mariko took us on a journey about the ABC program which can be seen on iView called Mistry Road.

Martin:

The Howie Games podcast Number 95 is about the NBA basketball player plays for San Antonio, Texas. It’s a really good podcast because Patty Mills describes his aboriginal Australian indigenous background. His father is from the Torres Strait Thursday Island area and he spent all his life on the water spearfishing a big kid while his mother’s home is Ceduna in South Australia.

Patty spends a lot of time talking about his indigenous background and how culture is important to him and how he carried his culture through with him when he lived in the eastern section of San Francisco bay when he first moved to USA to play basketball. 

While in America he has all his indigenous artefacts around his house practices his culture this is to aboriginal music and its appropriate food to his background. 

In the first game of the finals in 2014 the coach said to the team do you know what day it is today it’s June 3 and went to tell the Eddie Mabo story to the whole team. Apparently the Saint Antonio spurs really take pride in understanding the cultural background of all the different players. 

In fact at one point there is a recording of I think of Patty doing an acknowledgement to country to the local indigenous Indian people in the area. When the spurs went on to win the NBA finals there is footage Patty wearing an aboriginal flag in the celebrations. 

The podcast is in two parts and Part I focuses on these aboriginals first nation cultural issues really are quite interesting program and most relevant to this week of National Reconciliation

Part A 

https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/the-howie-games/id1146329262?i=1000475202324

Part B

https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/the-howie-games/id1146329262?i=1000475202325

Then there is the basketball aspect of the program. The San Antonio Spurs won the world Championships in the NBA basketball in 2014 against the Miami Heat. 

It’s a really interesting story we’ve had he came from how I got there is a 6 foot tall which is tall from my point of you it’s all compare to the other seven for Glass and he had to work to his trucks because basically the cemetery do against 7 foot tall and three meter wide Giants.

National reconciliation and Hornsby

National reconciliation and Hornsby

How how can Hornsby Shire contribute to the cause of national reconciliation it is this national reconciliation week?

If the vision is to have reconciliation in Hornsby then the mission is to develop a strategy that makes this possible.

I suggest a mission with a two pronged approach as a strategy.

Firstly there is what I called three CCCs the communication around the reconciliation, establishing connections in the community around reconciliation and building collaboration within the community around reconciliation.

In particular this will involve mobilising a third party when it comes to understanding the issue.

Historically there were the oppressed and the oppressors and even then there were people who would watch. The watchers may be too scared to offer their views or are undecided or don’t care.

Today progress has been made to apologise and say sorry for the past. The way for communication, connections and collaboration will work is by bringing in the watchers so there is a critical mass to develop a strategy for reconciliation.

Let me just elaborate what I will consider to be in the communication stage and in Hornsby that would be in the through building cultural awareness of first Nations people‘s.

What would this look like?

It would be by having aboriginal cultural artefacts on cycle past that the council is developing, Along the interconnecting bush trails between the suburbs and hopefully the six places walk, and in the recreational areas and parklands of the various suburbs of the Shire. This communication of the awareness of aboriginal cultural understandings will led to connections and collaborations.

The next stage of the mission to enabling reconciliation is a strategic Implementation plan where the community works together to be a leading local government area in the space of national reconciliation.

Howie Games Podcast and Patty Mills

The Howie Games podcast Number 95 is about the NBA basketball player plays for San Antonio, Texas. It’s a really good podcast because Patty describes his aboriginal Australian indigenous background. His father is from the Torres Strait Thursday Island area and he spent all his life on the water spearfishing a big kid while his mother’s home is Ceduna in South Australia – I assume desert people

Patty spends a lot of time talking about his indigenous background and how culture is important to him and how he carried his culture through with him when he lived in the eastern section of San Francisco bay when he first moved to USA to play basketball.

While in America he has all his indigenous artefacts around his house practices his culture this is to aboriginal music and its appropriate food to his background.

In the first game of the finals in 2014 the coach said to the team do you know what day it is today it’s June 3 and went to tell the Eddie Mabo story to the whole team. Apparently the Saint Antonio spurs really take pride in understanding the cultural background of all the different players.

In fact at one point there is a recording of I think of Patty doing an acknowledgement to country to the local indigenous Indian people in the area. When the spurs went on to win the NBA finals there is footage Patty wearing an aboriginal flag in the celebrations.

The podcast is in two parts and Part I focuses on these aboriginals first nation cultural issues really are quite interesting program and most relevant to this week of National Reconciliation

Part A 

https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/the-howie-games/id1146329262?i=1000475202324

Part B

https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/the-howie-games/id1146329262?i=1000475202325

Then there is the basketball aspect of the program. The San Antonio Spurs won the world Championships in the NBA basketball in 2014 against the Miami Heat.

It’s a really interesting story we’ve had he came from how I got there is a 6 foot tall which is tall from my point of you it’s all compare to the other seven for Glass and he had to work to his trucks because basically the cemetery do against 7 foot tall and three meter wide Giants.

What does the National Reconciliation Week mean to me?

What does National Reconciliation Week mean to me?

This means different things to different people. For many years, due to my family and professional life.

I’ve been aware of all sides of the debate. In 2018 I made a conscious decision to make a contribution based on my skill set as an educator and made a written submission to the constitutional recognition parliamentary inquiry and made a public statement at the other hearing at the Aboriginal Centre of Excellence in Redfern.

That has been the extent my public involvement in this issue. In preparation for this program we have been talking about today what national recognition means to me I recently listened to a podcast about Gandhi and his use of popular activism and nonviolence.

This particular podcast made the point that there are not to but three stakeholders in this discussion. The oppressed the oppresses and the watchers. 

From my perspective there are three ways to understand watchers .

Firstly, there are those you have an opinion I don’t want to express it due to their unwillingness to be criticised from those on the opposite side to what their opinion is.

Secondly there are the watches you have an opinion but don’t have the confidence or all the arguments to support their opinion and therefore remain silent.

Thirdly there are those that are watchers because they genuinely see both sides of the argument and cannot work out where they sit.

For me it’s about respecting the views of these three groups of people in the group called watchers and working together.

Moving forward, if progress is to be made to bring the nation together, the watchers need to get involved in the discussion; building their awareness, working with others, establishing a critical mass and a dialogue to build a strategic direction.

There is a saying I heard form Nathan Cleary the Penrith rugby League player:

“Good actions in the future are best policy for bad actions in the past.”

I have been brought up on the understanding two principles.

Firstly, that in the past you did something wrong intentional or otherwise you should apologise and say sorry. As a country we have made progress on this front.

Secondly, the next thing I have learnt in life is to then work together not revisiting the past to improve the situation.

This is where I would like the watchers make an impact on national reconciliation.

National Reconciliation Week 2020

This week in National Reconciliation Week. It is important to acknowledge this week in a way that suits you.

Through my parents and family life we, as a non aboriginal family, have had an awareness and limited involvement in the Australian Aboriginal communities. Through my personal and professional life I have connected with Aboriginal communities a a deeper way , through still limited than just a tourist. Most of my cultural artefacts and some paintings have come from real connections in communities.

I have always felt inadequate in this area as a non aboriginal person but I try and do what I can do and in my case was to contribute where I can where appropriate and build awareness.

So a few years ago I made a submission and a public statement to the Constitutional Recognition Relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples 
05/10/2018
 

I wrote a 6000 word submission and forgot about it. I saw there was a public hearing at the Aboriginal Centre of Excellence in Redfern.

It was during the school holidays and I thought I would go and observe. I sat there for the day and loved it. when there my federal Member Julian Leeser was there as co chair with Senator Patrick Dobson and the Aunty of one of my students senator McCarthy.

During the hearing Mr leeser asked if I would like to make a statement. I said yes without hesitation.

I quickly looked at my phone and took a few bullet points of notes from my submission. I did not think about it but many months later I realised what I said appeared as a transcript of the hearings and even a section of what I said was quoted in the report.

It might not mean much but that is one small contribution I have made.

Below are Triple H Streetbeat Interviews with Dr Mariko Smith discussion Constitutional Recognition.

Part2 /3

Part2 /3

Part 3/3

Part 3/3

Dangar Island Telecommunications Tower Warren Waddell

This is a discussion with Hornsby Shire Councillor Warren Waddell (Ward A) concerning a much needed telecommunications tower on Dangar Island. This initiative is in the context of Berowra’s Federal Member Julian Leeser representing the community to improve their access to WiFi and mobile phone connectivity and removing black spots.


https://soundcloud.com/martinpluss/warren-waddell-may-16-2020-dangar-island-full-interview

Streetbeat Eyes and Ears 22 May 2020

Neil:

TV Series – What we do in the Shadows. Neil focused on Episode 2 about Council Meetings

Mariko:

Mariko has discovered I Heart Radio and the proem Fake Doctor Real Friends. In this program a couple of people talk about the different episodes of Scrubs

Martin:

Ian Lomond is a new crime fiction writer of the Reid and Kidman series. Ian draws on his experiences as a resident of Sydney and a career in technology working in the police and justice sector. 

He writes with an empathy and understanding of the human condition with thoughtful one-liners such as the self talk of one of the detectives Reid – “own your emotion, calm down.” 

Anyone who knows or lives in the streets of Sydney will identify with the suburb descriptions, the roads travelled upon and the people in these locations. 

It is very easy to visualise the homeless people of the the Cross, the cyclists in Pyrmont, the runners and prams on the Bay Run, empty factories along the banks of the Lane Cover River, the McMansions of Northwest Sydney, mansions in Vaucluse, the fibros of Western Sydney and of course how to dodge the traffic and freeway tolls of the Sydney roads. 

Ian provides clear insight into the workspaces of those working in the technology and innovations sector with open spaces, table tennis tables, lounges, scooters dotting the room as a mean fo car-less transport and hip clothes and hairstyle. You attain a greater appreciation of the daily coffee of the police through to the takeaway meals and working shift hours. 

There are windows into the private life of Reid, married with two children living in the north west of Sydney, and Kidman in his one bedroom unit in Glebe. Kidman has years of instinct to work from and Reid equally competent and building her instinct for the criminal mind and circumstances.

There is a cool arrangement of police characters young /old, new to the service/ experienced, those driven by data and evidence through to those initially acting on instinct and there are those finding their feet. 

There are wonderful insights into technology. I particularly like the way the criminals communicated with each other with out communication with each other so their messages would not be tracked. 

In the novel two charactacters have the same email accounts in different locations and they communicate through drafts so messages are not sent between each other – very clever insights for the reader. 

Then there is the unique way ‘lost’ data is retrieved through an understanding how syncing works with cloud storage in products like DropBox. Finally, then there is all the technology related to the plot. 

An innovation centre is located at Lane Cove and a man is found dead in a car park after his pitch about tracking software. Two people find him, are interviewed and their lives are involved in the story. 

There are the privacy issues in relation to a tracking device that knows your movements, spending habits, with the hope it can be monetised for business. Surrounding this is the murder in Sydney which needs to be solved 

The books is an easy read, moving from person to person place to place in Sydney. I have a good knowledge of Sydney I could easily see where the characters were through the description and focused my attention and interest. It would be an equally good read for a guest to the city as all the key landscapes are featured. 

I don’t read too much that keeps me reading till 2:00am in the morning but this was achieved by Death Investor: who would kill for privacy. Thanks Ian.